More on the “sorrows of academic corporatization.”

The latest issue of The Nation brings us the following article

Faulty Towers: The Crisis in Higher Education

In addition to the other issues raised, many of which have been well-covered, I find the following excerpt interesting:

As Gaye Tuchman explains in Wannabe U (2009), a case study in the sorrows of academic corporatization, deans, provosts and presidents are no longer professors who cycle through administrative duties and then return to teaching and research. Instead, they have become a separate stratum of managerial careerists, jumping from job to job and organization to organization like any other executive: isolated from the faculty and its values, loyal to an ethos of short-term expansion, and trading in the business blather of measurability, revenue streams, mission statements and the like. They do not have the long-term health of their institutions at heart. They want to pump up the stock price (i.e., U.S. News and World Report ranking) and move on to the next fat post.

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One Response to More on the “sorrows of academic corporatization.”

  1. Frank says:

    “trading in the business blather of measurability, revenue streams, mission statements and the like.”

    Your friend Prof Optimist not going to appreciate you demeaning her hard work.

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